Craft on Demand: The New Politics of the Handmade

Craft on Demand: The New Politics of the Handmade is a publication on contemporary craft politics edited by Anthea Black and Nicole Burisch. Craft on Demand examines the role of the handmade in contemporary art, craft and design as part

Craft on Demand: The New Politics of the Handmade

Craft on Demand: The New Politics of the Handmade is a publication on contemporary craft politics edited by Anthea Black and Nicole Burisch. Craft on Demand examines the role of the handmade in contemporary art, craft and design as part

NO PLACE: Queer Geographies on Screen

NO PLACE: Queer Geographies on Screen is a touring exhibition program that features the work of Canadian and international queer and trans-identified artists who examine ways in which queer notions of place, mapping, and geography are realized on screen. The works

NO PLACE: Queer Geographies on Screen

NO PLACE: Queer Geographies on Screen is a touring exhibition program that features the work of Canadian and international queer and trans-identified artists who examine ways in which queer notions of place, mapping, and geography are realized on screen. The works

PASS

Many kinds of queer and material knowledge are constructed around the notion of passing, including elaborate forms of hair, self-presentation, drag, and costume. Queer bodies know and hold more than can be told, or spoken; for one night only we

PASS

Many kinds of queer and material knowledge are constructed around the notion of passing, including elaborate forms of hair, self-presentation, drag, and costume. Queer bodies know and hold more than can be told, or spoken; for one night only we

PLEASURE CRAFT

Curated by Anthea Black, this screening explores appearances of craft and hand making in film and video from the 1960s to the present, where craft is a temporal process rather than a fixed object. Featuring works by Charles and Ray

PLEASURE CRAFT

Curated by Anthea Black, this screening explores appearances of craft and hand making in film and video from the 1960s to the present, where craft is a temporal process rather than a fixed object. Featuring works by Charles and Ray

Tea Time Folio: Mapping Informal Networks of Women Living with HIV

The Tea Time Folio is a series of limited edition prints by Anthea Black, Jessica MacCormack, and Johnny Nawrajac produced for Jessica Whitbread’s book Tea Time: Mapping Informal Networks of Women Living with HIV. Produced by Anthea Black and Jessica

Tea Time Folio: Mapping Informal Networks of Women Living with HIV

The Tea Time Folio is a series of limited edition prints by Anthea Black, Jessica MacCormack, and Johnny Nawrajac produced for Jessica Whitbread’s book Tea Time: Mapping Informal Networks of Women Living with HIV. Produced by Anthea Black and Jessica

DO LESS WITH LESS / DO MORE WITH MORE

Ladies’ Invitational Deadbeat Society’s limited edition DO LESS WITH LESS / DO MORE WITH MORE cross stitch pattern poster. The slogan on the original posters was drawn from Artivistic’s Promiscuous Infrastructures project at Centre des arts actuels Skol in Montréal, Québec

DO LESS WITH LESS / DO MORE WITH MORE

Ladies’ Invitational Deadbeat Society’s limited edition DO LESS WITH LESS / DO MORE WITH MORE cross stitch pattern poster. The slogan on the original posters was drawn from Artivistic’s Promiscuous Infrastructures project at Centre des arts actuels Skol in Montréal, Québec

Performing Austerity: Artists, Work, and Economic Speculation

The relationship between arts economies and austerity is a tumultuous one. We need only recall Stephen Harper’s sneering 2008 categorization of artists as rich complainers as evidence of the persistent myths that are used to devalue artistic work as “non-essential”

Performing Austerity: Artists, Work, and Economic Speculation

The relationship between arts economies and austerity is a tumultuous one. We need only recall Stephen Harper’s sneering 2008 categorization of artists as rich complainers as evidence of the persistent myths that are used to devalue artistic work as “non-essential”